Mon 05 Apr 2004 21:35:30 GMT

April 5, 2004

So we’re working on migrating our printing infrastructure from lprng-based to cups.

So I’m thinking I’m not treading new ground here. I’ve got about 10 or 12 printers in a network. Nothing fancy. Everyone prints to the local print server which redirects their job and/or filters it as need be. One catch, some of the printers are parallel or usb printers dangling off of some of the clients. So right now a user would print to the central print server, it would redirect it to an lpd on a client somewhere which has the printer directly connected and it would print. I’ve read up on this and this is a really tame printer configuration.

So I figure something similar will be easy under cups.

I look at the ServerName option in clients.conf – it looks like it does what I want, I set that and all the printer commands talk to the server for everything, no additional local queues and we’re cooking. Yay. However, I can’t have a locally defined printer on the machine then – it won’t accept the connections, so that’s out.

Then I look at browsepoll and acquiring the printers via the ipp browsing concept. This looks good, if I point the browsing at my print server and say ‘go get the printers on that machine’ it populates the lists and it’s looking tasty and good. But then everything is locally queued on the client and when I print I can’t remove the job from the central print server queue. I think: “surely this can’t be right, it must be a configuration silliness on my part.” Then I find this pain. Why on earth would I want to have to more-or-less guess to find the remote queue job id to just cancel a job from the queue is beyond me.

ok, so now I’m dropping back and punting and trying to find out if I can run cupsd on an alternate port to talk to a local printer to go back to step one and try again.

I will not be defeated yet.

If someone knows what I’m doing and knows how to make it work like I’d expect it to (which I admit is largely biased by my lprng background), I’d appreciate a note.

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