If you wake up in a relatively good mood and you feel the urge to read or write email, just remember that if you read email, don’t write any. And if you write any, don’t SEND any.

this is the key to keeping the relatively good mood in place.

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kopers/ppas progress

March 26, 2010

We had a meeting on wednesday about kopers and what they all meant and whether or not fedora should encourage or discourage such things.

We didn’t really decide any of those things but Toshio and I came up with two pieces of the  whole system to work on that, even if we decide kopers are a bad idea, will still be useful things to have written:

1. an authenticated task scheduler using python/tg and/or possibly amqp

2. a way to build inside a vm instead of only inside a chroot.

Toshio is working 1 and I’m working on 2.

kopers/personal repos

March 24, 2010

Tom asked Toshio and me to look into how to implement something like the kopers proposal that Jesse wrote up a while back. Toshio and I have been doing a bunch of research on it and have come up a bunch of issues and some questions about it. The most pressing question is this:

– If kopers/fedora ppas make creating(and hosting) new/different variants of pkgs easier, are we just encouraging a dependency/provides explosion of incompatibility  and, ultimately, pain in debugging. OR are we just facilitating what is already happening now and lifting user frustration?

In short, does providing the technology to do what a koper is make our lives better or worse?

Let me give some examples of better:

– easier hosting of the 5 pkgs with interdependent build processes for any given use

– easier updating of repos and searching of them

– advancing the tooling in parts of our build infrastructure (mock and createrepo in particular)

Some examples of worse:

– now instead of an average user having 3-5 repos enabled (fedora, updates, rpmfusion, adobe-flash) they have a lot more

– polluting the search namespace for google and others to confuse people looking for ‘python-frazzlebutt’.

– confusing an average user as to what is a Fedora Project pkg and what is just something provided from a fedora domain by some random user.

– making every developer debugging a problem have to ask the: what pkgs do you have installed and can you give me full details of where you got them from. (to be fair, yum now records the repo a package was installed from so this information is not difficult to come by)

At the moment I’m inclined to believe that folks are making their own pkgs and repos already and we have a smaller scale of the ‘cons’. So that by making it easier we will make a larger number of them but it’s not altogether new. And I know that enhancing some of the tools will be helpful, if only to the folks using them to build local repos of their own stuff.

Anyone have any thoughts on ths subject?

Update: Toshio was kind enough to point out this blog post from fedora’s very own Adam Williamson before he came to fedora.

From about 2001 until about 2009 I used evolution as my mail client. I got addicted to how it handled vfolders and got comfy with it. Then vfolders self-destructed and started telling me I had MAXINT new messages while not actually having ANY mail and well, it stopped being useful for me. So I switched back to my old stand by of alpine. It works fine more or less there is only one feature I miss from evolution – the ability to have multiple windows open when I’m composing a mail. So I can get info out of one mail and paste it in to use in the one I’m composing.

I setup claws-mail this weekend to see how that would work for me. It looked very hopeful until I went to setup multiple imap servers and it refused to see the other imap server at all. It’s like it didn’t even exist. So I shelved it back away and went looking for something else. Nothing has sprung up so far. We’ll see.

Suggestions are welcome, but here’s what I’ve tried:

thunderbird –

kmail –

alpine

mutt

claws

evolution

James Antill is old

March 18, 2010

well, he’ll be older very soon (Saturday) – and I wanted to say happy birthday to him in a public and annoying way. 🙂

If you’ve used yum recently you’ve probably benefited from work that James has done. The yum history command in particular was entirely his work. James does some great stuff.

I discovered tonight that he has this amazon wishlist of all sorts of random things. So if you appreciate something James has worked on and you want to wish him a happy birthday, hint, hint.

threats and ultimatums

March 9, 2010

I consider threats and ultimatums to be promises of action. A kind of contract, really.

If I do X then  you will do Y.

So if I do X and you don’t make good on your ultimatum of doing Y then I think I should make good on it FOR you.

a reminder

March 9, 2010

fedora is not a government nor a government body.

no one has any ‘rights’ in fedora.

Please don’t confuse the rights granted to you by your own national or local gov’t as something fedora has granted or has to ensure in your discussions about fedora.